Our City Our Plan - Jefferson Lane

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We recently asked the community for their feedback on Our City Our Plan to help shape the future of the Gold Coast.

We received 1631 submissions of feedback during two extensive consultation periods, which significantly influenced the proposed changes to City Plan.

Feedback received during the first round of consultation resulted in a proposed reduction in building height and residential density along the eastern side of Jefferson Lane at Palm Beach.

For the second round of consultation, while the proposed changes to Jefferson Lane were correctly communicated, the Residential density overlay mapping was incorrect.

We are therefore undertaking a third round of public consultation to give you every opportunity to provide feedback on the proposed reduction in residential density along Jefferson Lane, Palm Beach – refer to the Residential density overlay map.

You can have your say on these proposed changes from 12 May to 10 June 2020.

We’d like to thank the Gold Coast for their continued contribution to helping shape the future of the Gold Coast.

We recently asked the community for their feedback on Our City Our Plan to help shape the future of the Gold Coast.

We received 1631 submissions of feedback during two extensive consultation periods, which significantly influenced the proposed changes to City Plan.

Feedback received during the first round of consultation resulted in a proposed reduction in building height and residential density along the eastern side of Jefferson Lane at Palm Beach.

For the second round of consultation, while the proposed changes to Jefferson Lane were correctly communicated, the Residential density overlay mapping was incorrect.

We are therefore undertaking a third round of public consultation to give you every opportunity to provide feedback on the proposed reduction in residential density along Jefferson Lane, Palm Beach – refer to the Residential density overlay map.

You can have your say on these proposed changes from 12 May to 10 June 2020.

We’d like to thank the Gold Coast for their continued contribution to helping shape the future of the Gold Coast.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Do you have questions about the proposed amendment? Post your question in the public forum and one of our planners will be in contact with you shortly.

Prefer a private discussion? Please contact us via our planning hotline 1300 151 267 or CityPlanSubmissions@goldcoast.qld.gov.au

Please be aware submitted questions and responses are available for public view. Please refer to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Moderation Guidelines before posting. 

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    To be approved, is it mandatory that all new development applications include 2 car parking bays per until? If not, how is the impact of extra demand on already limited parking availability taken into consideration in the City Plan?

    JudithNorty asked 5 months ago

    The current change we are seeking community input on relates only to a reduction in density on the eastern side of Jefferson Lane, Palm Beach.

    Please note, the Our City Our Plan amendments did not propose changes to the off-street car parking rates for apartment style developments. However, a change to the visitor car parking rates for apartments was proposed (and subject to public consultation between 27 September 2019 to 11 November 2019).

    The nominated car parking requirements seek to ensure development provides sufficient car parking to accommodate the parking demand and allows for various modes of travel to reduce dependency on private vehicle usage. This policy approach aims to ensure that new development provides its car parking off-street, rather than relying on on-street car parking.

    The Transport code sets out parking requirements for different land uses within an Acceptable outcome (see Table 9.4.13-3). For Multiple dwelling developments, the following rates are provided:

    (a) 1 per 1 bedroom unit or dwelling;

    (b) 1.25 per 2 bedroom unit or dwelling;

    (c) 1.5 per 3 bedroom unit or dwelling;

    (d) 2 per 4 bedroom unit or dwelling;

    Plus:

    (a) where 3 to 4 dwellings, 1 for visitor parking; or

    (b) where 5 to 6 dwellings, 2 for visitor parking; or

    (c) where 7 to 9 dwellings, 3 for visitor parking; or

    (d) where 10 or more dwellings, 3 plus 1 per 10 dwellings for visitor parking thereafter

    Note: At least 50 per cent of visitor parking to be provided in a single location.

    The City is aware of car parking issues in some parts of the city and is responding by undertaking a broader car parking review. Any recommendations from this investigation will be implemented through a future City Plan amendment. 

    The City Parking Plan 2015 (available at https://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/documents/bf/City_Parking_Plan_book_WEB.pdf) identifies broader strategies and programs the City will implement to improve the accessibility and availability of on-street and off-street car parking for residents and visitors.


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    I recently noticed an approval for 1109 Gold Coast Highway on a 460 sqm lot which will have a new entry from Jefferson Lane, near Beach Palms. This development has 16 bedrooms and is higher than 5 stories and is in fact 8 stories. We were shocked to see this on a small lot and seems to not match up to your equation below ie 460/33 (old density RD6) = 13.93 bedrooms! Could you help me understand as we were also shocked about parking as 10 + 2 visitors hardly seems adequate for 3 & 4 bedroom units. Furthermore the proposed building extends right to the boundaries with little or no greenery. This is certainly not the way we would like to see the western side of Jefferson Lane develop as it removes the beachside community to replace with cars and concrete.

    DW asked 6 months ago

    The Planning Act 2016 and the State Planning Policy require all Queensland councils to adopt performance-based planning schemes to allow for innovation and flexibility.

    Each code within City Plan contains Overall outcomes and Performance outcomes (which describe the qualities sought by development – for example ‘setbacks protect the amenity of adjacent uses’) and Acceptable outcomes (which provide an acceptable quantitative measure of meeting the qualities sought by the Performance outcome – for example ‘side setbacks are 1.5 metres’).

    However, meeting the Acceptable outcome is not mandatory. An application can achieve compliance with the code by meeting either the Overall outcomes, Performance outcomes or Acceptable outcomes. This may be perceived as a ‘relaxation’; however, alternative measures assessed against the purpose of the code are a valid way of achieving compliance with the City Plan, as per the State legislation.

    The current City Plan triggers impact assessment where the height designation is exceeded in all zones. It should be noted that in the Medium and High density residential zones, an increase of up to 50 per cent above the mapped building heights can be achieved only through impact assessment. The 50 per cent building height exceedance is retained within the Strategic framework; however, it is only allowed in specific zones and in limited circumstances.

    The 50 per cent exceedance test was introduced with the City Plan in 2016 as a defensible provision in a performance-based planning regime. Prior to the introduction of this provision there was no maximum cap on the heights that could be proposed.

    The City is currently undertaking the investigations required to support the delivery of the final phases of the Building Height Study to redefine the City’s building height policy in the City Plan (refer to the related Council report for additional information: https://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/documents/ma/economy-20191106-adoptedreport_Part1.pdf).

    The last phase involves potentially removing the 50 per cent exceedance test from the Strategic framework and using the endorsed city-wide building height principles to redefine the City’s building height policy in the City Plan. This is envisaged to be implemented in the next major update to the City Plan.

    It is important to note that within Palm Beach a large portion of the Medium density residential zone west of the Gold Coast Highway, which had an existing building height designation of two storeys (9 metres) and three storeys (15 metres) is included in the new Low-medium density residential zone which is being introduced as part of the Our City Our Plan amendment. This new zone does not contemplate any additional height above the planned building height as identified on the Building height overlay map.

    The proposed amendment also introduces six design principles to the Strategic Framework in the section titled Element – Architecture and urban design. The six design principles, namely Responsive, Connected, Engaged, Subtropical, Attractive and Adaptable. These principles have also been reflected throughout various code provisions in the City Plan. However, in response to submissions received during the first round of public consultation, further changes were proposed to built form outcomes including site cover, setbacks, deep planting and the Site context and urban design (SCUD) policy.

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    What does RD6 and RD5 mean?

    Marcello asked 6 months ago

    The RD6 density designation allows for 1 bedroom per 33 square metres of site area, with RD5 allowing for 1 bedroom per 50 square metres of site area.

    As an example, on a 1,000 square metre site, RD6 would allow for a development with 30 bedrooms and RD5 would allow for a development with 20 bedrooms.

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    What is the height of this proposal & how many levels does it allow Palm beach should not have more than 9 levels anywhere

    leigo asked 6 months ago

    In response to feedback received during public consultation and to respond to infrastructure constraints, changes were proposed to the planned building heights, density and zoning in Jefferson Lane, Palm Beach, between Seventeenth Avenue and Laceys Lane.

    The residential zoned land on the eastern side of Jefferson Lane has been changed as follows:

    • planned building height has changed from 29m to 16m 
    • zoning has changed from the Medium density residential zone to the Low-medium density residential zone. 


    On the western side of Jefferson Lane, the planned building height has been changed from 29m to 17m for land in the Medium density residential zone.

    The current change open for consultation is a reduce the residential density designation for the eastern side of Jefferson Lane from RD6 (1 bedroom per 33m2 of site area) to RD5 (1 bedroom per 50m2 of site area).

    Since the introduction of the City Plan in 2016, the application of State-mandated definitions relating to building height and storeys has resulted in some interpretation difficulties. Therefore, to remove this interpretation difficulty, the City has moved to just measuring building height in metres only.

    The purpose of this change is to improve clarity for applicants and the community, by having a single building height designation with a specific measurement. 

    The proposed changes to 16m and 17m along Jefferson Lane could accommodate building's of up to five storeys.