Our Resilient City

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Our plan for coastal adaptation

Gold Coast is one of Australia’s most iconic coastal cities, with golden beaches, endless waterways and a beautiful natural landscape.

Our precious coastal environment is dynamic and always changing. To protect and safeguard our coast for the future, we’re developing Our Resilient City – our plan for coastal adaptation.

State Government projections indicate by 2100 sea level rise and more cyclone activity tracking south which could mean an increase in coastal hazards like erosion, storm tides and flooding.

The City of Gold Coast, stakeholders, asset owners, key agencies and the community are collaborating to start the conversation on how we can better understand coastal hazards and respond with cost-effective adaptation options, now and into the future.

Community engagement runs from 2 to 23 September 2020.

How can I become involved?

The development of Our Resilient City - our plan for coastal adaptation provides a platform for conversations about what we value and how we manage our coastline together. If you are interested in our city's future resilience, we want to hear from you.

  • Choose a pin, share your story, photos or videos to help our coastal adaptation plans.
  • Join in the discussion by asking a question below.
  • Talk to the team about coastal adaptation by emailing ourresilientcity@goldcoast.qld.gov.au
  • Stay informed by subscribing to receive project updates.
About the QCoast2100 Program

The City, together with 41 other Queensland Councils, was awarded funding under the State Government's $12 million Coastal Hazards Adaptation program (QCoast2100) to develop effective plans to minimise the impacts of coastal hazards.

According to the State Government, by 2100 sea level rise is projected to be 0.8 metres with a possibility of cyclone activity increasing and tracking south more often. This means changes to coastal areas with increased erosion, storm tides and flooding in low lying areas. Visit QCoast2100.com.au

What is an adaptation option?

A recommended option to avoid, manage and mitigate a future coastal hazard. Options are underpinned by extensive community and stakeholder input and the best available science, engineering and economic studies. Coastal hazard adaptation options include planning options. These recommended options to maintain, modify or change an existing approach can be in the following areas:

  • retreat or land use planning and development assessment,
  • infrastructure planning and management,
  • asset management,
  • community planning,
  • business continuity planning, and
  • emergency management.

Council requires a broad range of options to identify the risks, the existing controls and indicate the level of support for these options.

Our Coastal Management

The City invests heavily in managing and caring for our coastline. We work all year round to manage, maintain and protect our precious Gold Coast. Our ongoing projects include the maintenance and construction of seawalls, sand pumping and dredging, landscaping and coastline infrastructure works.

Visit our Coastal Management page to find out more.

City of Gold Coast logoQCoast2100 logoLocal Government Association of Queensland logoQueensland Government logo


Our plan for coastal adaptation

Gold Coast is one of Australia’s most iconic coastal cities, with golden beaches, endless waterways and a beautiful natural landscape.

Our precious coastal environment is dynamic and always changing. To protect and safeguard our coast for the future, we’re developing Our Resilient City – our plan for coastal adaptation.

State Government projections indicate by 2100 sea level rise and more cyclone activity tracking south which could mean an increase in coastal hazards like erosion, storm tides and flooding.

The City of Gold Coast, stakeholders, asset owners, key agencies and the community are collaborating to start the conversation on how we can better understand coastal hazards and respond with cost-effective adaptation options, now and into the future.

Community engagement runs from 2 to 23 September 2020.

How can I become involved?

The development of Our Resilient City - our plan for coastal adaptation provides a platform for conversations about what we value and how we manage our coastline together. If you are interested in our city's future resilience, we want to hear from you.

  • Choose a pin, share your story, photos or videos to help our coastal adaptation plans.
  • Join in the discussion by asking a question below.
  • Talk to the team about coastal adaptation by emailing ourresilientcity@goldcoast.qld.gov.au
  • Stay informed by subscribing to receive project updates.
About the QCoast2100 Program

The City, together with 41 other Queensland Councils, was awarded funding under the State Government's $12 million Coastal Hazards Adaptation program (QCoast2100) to develop effective plans to minimise the impacts of coastal hazards.

According to the State Government, by 2100 sea level rise is projected to be 0.8 metres with a possibility of cyclone activity increasing and tracking south more often. This means changes to coastal areas with increased erosion, storm tides and flooding in low lying areas. Visit QCoast2100.com.au

What is an adaptation option?

A recommended option to avoid, manage and mitigate a future coastal hazard. Options are underpinned by extensive community and stakeholder input and the best available science, engineering and economic studies. Coastal hazard adaptation options include planning options. These recommended options to maintain, modify or change an existing approach can be in the following areas:

  • retreat or land use planning and development assessment,
  • infrastructure planning and management,
  • asset management,
  • community planning,
  • business continuity planning, and
  • emergency management.

Council requires a broad range of options to identify the risks, the existing controls and indicate the level of support for these options.

Our Coastal Management

The City invests heavily in managing and caring for our coastline. We work all year round to manage, maintain and protect our precious Gold Coast. Our ongoing projects include the maintenance and construction of seawalls, sand pumping and dredging, landscaping and coastline infrastructure works.

Visit our Coastal Management page to find out more.

City of Gold Coast logoQCoast2100 logoLocal Government Association of Queensland logoQueensland Government logo


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Provide your suggestion below for mitigating coastal hazards?

Alternatively, if you have a question or feedback relating to a different council matter, please visit the contact us page on the City of Gold Coast website

Provide your suggestion in private, contact us ourresilientcity@goldcoast.qld.gov.au 

Please be aware submitted questions and responses are available for public view. Please refer to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Moderation Guidelines before posting.

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    Will Gold Coast Light Rail stage 3 be raised above PMF or the revised Q100 flood levels such that evacuation can be facilitated and has Council budgeted to lift all its major roads and sewerage infrastructure above the new flood levels ?

    JasonME asked about 1 month ago

    Thanks for your queries Jason. 

    With respect to your enquiry about the Gold Coast Light Rail Stage 3, the Queensland State Government Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR) is the project lead for this, and the City of Gold Coast role is as a collaborative partner.  For all enquiries relating to the Gold Coast Light Rail please contact: 

    Email:  gclr3@tmr.qld.gov.au 

    Phone: 1800 312 600 

    Furthermore, I note the City's major roads are also owned by the state government. Notwithstanding these roads, the timeframes associated with this current initiative (i.e. 2100), which includes the planning for any adaptation measures required for the management of Council's roads and sewerage infrastructure into the future, inherently requires a consideration of the necessary budgeting also. The development of the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy is a great opportunity for the City to undertake this consideration. 

    Thank you again for your contribution.


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    Replant the shrubs and trees denuded from the Burleigh Heads areas due to the continuing illegal campers ruining the protection That has been there for years. I can’t manage to place a pin. I am a pensioner. Very interested in protection our incredible environment for future generations.

    MAWard asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your valuable feedback. You have raised a very important issue and the 'Our Resilient City' team will endeavour to ensure your feedback is captured in the development of the Gold Coast Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy. Additionally, we will provide your feedback to Council's Coastal Beaches Parks and Maintenance team for their review and for their maintenance planning (https://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/our-ocean-beaches-15174.html). For more information or to provide further feedback on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards, feel free to visit or contact us again here https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity.

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    We need an esplanade with shade through palm beach. Currently the entire esplanade from 23rd Avenue to Tallebudgera is devoid of shade. Given Queensland has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world- this is unacceptable. There is no where to rest or sit in the shade, and view the ocean at the same time. Tree planting along the esplanade for shade respite is essential to force the heat stroke in summer in the elderly and young, and to have sun safe options for walkers.

    LRUhlmann asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your valuable feedback. You have raised some very important points and the 'Our Resilient City' team will endeavour to ensure your feedback is captured in the development of the Gold Coast Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy. Additionally, we will provide your feedback to Council's Parks and Maintenance team for their review and for their parks maintenance planning. For more information or to provide further feedback on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards, feel free to use the ‘Pin the map’ tool to tell us what else you value about our coastal environment here https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity.

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    No question, is just like to see more trash bins and removal near waterways especially. They’re a lot of parks that are beside canal and river beaches and the rubbish is sitting waiting to be blown or picked up by the tide. These parks need special attention. I’d like to see rubbish pick up rallies organized as a fun community thing. Make a dint on the waste going out to see. Also cleaning what rubbish is already in the water. Canal by canal!

    Marissa asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Marissa, Thank you for your comments. You have provided valuable feedback and Council officers will endeavour to ensure these comments are conveyed to Councils Parks and Maintenance team. We will also ensure your feedback is reflected in the development of the Gold Coast Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy. Thanks again for taking the time to provide feedback.

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    If the Gold Coadt City Council is aware of rising sea levels and erosion of beaches why do they allow developments that go right to the edge of the beach?

    WendyG asked about 2 months ago

    Dear Wendy, thank you for your question. 

    While there is great demand for beachfront development on the Gold Coast, the City Plan regulates development that is identified within the Coastal erosion hazard overlay map. (You can view this overlay map by triggering the applicable checkbox on the left hand side of the City Plan mapping tool here: http://cityplanmaps.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/CityPlan/). Specifically, coastal development is regulated by the application of the Coastal erosion hazard overlay code, viewable at part 8.2.4 of the City Plan here: https://cityplan.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/ePlan/#Rules/0/51/1/0 

    This overlay code regulates requirements, such as the setback of new developments from the open coast (i.e. setback from the A-line) to allow construction of an in-ground sea wall; and the replanting of the sand dune tops to further mitigate erosion, among other provisions. Such measures have been long standing policies of Council since the 1980s to ensure that beachfront development is appropriately established.

    In light of anticipated changes in coastal conditions, the current development of the Gold Coast Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy provides us, as a community, an opportunity to consider adaptation and management options for mitigating future coastal hazards. Accordingly, thank you for your question, as feedback allows consideration of a variety of ideas in the development of this strategy.

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    I am curious about the proposed development on the already flood-prone area on the waterway side of the Nerang - Broadbeach Rd Robina Parkway intersection when that land is lower than the adjacent roadways which still flood after heavy rain events. The signage at the site would suggest that approval has already been given, which appears to be ridiculous. Even if this is not the case, the proposal to build in this area is equally ridiculous and high-risk

    Mary Toomey asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Mary Toomey,

    Thank you for providing your concerns and feedback in relation to development and the potential inundation in the Nerang - Broadbeach Rd / Robina Parkway area.

    We are currently in the process of developing our plan for coastal adaptation, which factors in the sea level rise projections provided by the State Government. These projections include an increase of 0.8 metres by 2100.

    This plan scopes the various adaptation options to respond to current and future coastal hazards. We are currently seeking input from our stakeholders and the community about what we value and how we respond to coastal hazards with cost effective adaptation options. 

    Your feedback and/or suggestions on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards are encouraged via our ‘Pin the map’ tool on the ‘Our Resilient City’ webpage: https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity. This will assist us to prioritise areas for future coastal adaptation based on what the community tells us they value the most. 

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    Many of the Gold Coast's parks and open spaces are along creeks and beaches or on flood plains. Sea level rise will mean that many of these public open spaces will no longer be accessible to our growing population because they will be flooded. What steps are being taken as part of this current planning to ensure that there will be adequate public open space for residents and visitors?

    LoisLe asked about 2 months ago

    Hi LoisLe,

    Thank you for your correspondence in relation to potential inundation of our valued parks and open spaces along creeks and beaches.

    This plan scopes the various adaptation options to respond to current and future coastal hazards. We are currently seeking input from our stakeholders and the community about what we value and how we respond to coastal hazards with cost effective adaptation options. 

    Your feedback and/or suggestions on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards are encouraged via our ‘Pin the map’ tool on the ‘Our Resilient City’ webpage: https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity. This will assist us to prioritise areas for future coastal adaptation based on what the community tells us they value the most. 

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    Is it possible this plan will result in changes to the mapped/adopted flood levels around Lake Orr in Varisty Lakes?

    Harley Day asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Harley Day,

    Thank you for your correspondence in relation to potential inundation around Lake Orr in Varsity Lakes.

    This plan scopes the various adaptation options to respond to current and future coastal hazards based on the State’s projected 0.8 metre sea level rise by 2100.

    We are currently seeking input from our stakeholders and the community about what we value and how we respond to coastal hazards with cost effective adaptation options. 

    Any future changes to natural hazards overlay maps will be made in accordance with the Planning Act and Ministers Guidelines and Rules.

    Your feedback and/or suggestions on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards are encouraged via our ‘Pin the map’ tool on the ‘Our Resilient City’ webpage: https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity. 

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    With light rail, all of northern Palm Beach from Tallebudgera creek to 19th Avenue needs to become an esplanade. This will ensure the whole of palm beach can be one consistent esplanade. If this is not done, there will be traffic backing up from 19th Avenue back over Tallebudgera creek. As this is where children and young families swim it will be a huge hazard. Equally, ensure adequate crossing points across the GC highway from the west to the east. Trying to cross heavy traffic to get to the beach across rail tracks will be very hazardous.

    LRUhlmann asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you so much for providing feedback through our Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy engagement process. The important matters you have raised are relevant to several areas of authority, including the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads, so in the first instance you may wish to contact the Department. 

    With respect to Council, our Traffic and Transport division can be contacted via 5582 8211 or mail@goldcoast.qld.gov.au. More specifically however, the Department of Transport and Infrastructure are seeking feedback on the Light Rail here:  https://gclr3.com.au/ 

    For more information on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards, or to provide feedback regarding the development of our Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy, please feel free to navigate through the ‘Our Resilient City’ webpage https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity and tell us what you value about our coastal environment using the ‘Pin the map’ tool.

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    What is the GCCC plan to minimise the effects of rising sea water due to global warming in Jacobs Well and Cabbage Tree Point? As it is some of the lower lying areas are already affected by even moderate rainfall. Some houses regularly flood a d those of us with septic tanks have problems with that as well.

    madtam asked about 2 months ago

    Hi madtam,

    Thank you for your feedback. Your interest in minimising the effects of sea level rise and climate change in Jacobs Well and Cabbage Tree Point has been captured and will assist us to understand what the Gold Coast community values and how we need to plan to minimise the risk of these hazards in the future.

    We are currently in the process of developing our plan for coastal adaptation, which factors in the sea level rise projections provided by the State Government. These projections include an increase of 0.8 metres by 2100.

    For more information or to provide further feedback on planning for our City’s resilience to coastal hazards, feel free to navigate through the ‘Our Resilient City’ webpage https://gchaveyoursay.com.au/ourresilientcity and tell us what you value about our coastal environment using the ‘Pin the map’ tool.