Koala Conservation

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Koala Conservation Plan
The City is working hard to conserve koalas across the Gold Coast via the implementation of the city wide Koala Conservation Plan. This Koala Conservation Plan builds on the previous experience and learnings of the Elanora-Currumbin Waters, East Coomera and Burleigh Ridge koala conservation plans, and identifies informed and targeted actions to mitigate key threats to koalas across the city.

Community involvement
It is essential that community members, like you, get involved to ensure the long-term survival of koalas on the Gold Coast. You can get involved by:
  • becoming a member of the Koala Friends Program
  • completing a Koala Sighting Form to report a koala sighting
  • calling 1300 GOLDCOAST (1300 465 326) to report a koala sighting
  • sharing your koala story and uploading photos here.

Learn about koalas, the threats facing them, our conservation efforts to save them and what you can do to help koalas on the Gold Coast here.

Koala breeding season is July to January
During this period the movement of koalas increases as juveniles disperse in search of their own home range and adults seek a mate. the increase in movement also raises the chance of harm.

Have you found a koala that needs help?

If you see a koala that needs rescuing, call the Wildcare Australia Inc. 24 hour hotline on 07 5527 2444.

What to look out for to know if a koala needs rescuing:
  • being stuck on a fence in a hazardous situation, for example, beside a busy road
  • observed sitting or sleeping on the ground for an extended period
  • sitting in the same tree for more than 48 hours
  • physical signs of injury, for example, limping, inability to climb, blood patches on fur, etc.
  • any visibly missing fur
  • a 'wet' or 'dirty' reddish stained rump
  • conjunctivitis (red, swollen, weepy) eyes.
If you are unsure if a koala requires rescue, please call Wildcare Australia Inc. on 07 5527 2444. Advice can be provided over the phone and a record of the koala's location will be made for further observation or rescue.


Koala Conservation Plan
The City is working hard to conserve koalas across the Gold Coast via the implementation of the city wide Koala Conservation Plan. This Koala Conservation Plan builds on the previous experience and learnings of the Elanora-Currumbin Waters, East Coomera and Burleigh Ridge koala conservation plans, and identifies informed and targeted actions to mitigate key threats to koalas across the city.

Community involvement
It is essential that community members, like you, get involved to ensure the long-term survival of koalas on the Gold Coast. You can get involved by:
  • becoming a member of the Koala Friends Program
  • completing a Koala Sighting Form to report a koala sighting
  • calling 1300 GOLDCOAST (1300 465 326) to report a koala sighting
  • sharing your koala story and uploading photos here.

Learn about koalas, the threats facing them, our conservation efforts to save them and what you can do to help koalas on the Gold Coast here.

Koala breeding season is July to January
During this period the movement of koalas increases as juveniles disperse in search of their own home range and adults seek a mate. the increase in movement also raises the chance of harm.

Have you found a koala that needs help?

If you see a koala that needs rescuing, call the Wildcare Australia Inc. 24 hour hotline on 07 5527 2444.

What to look out for to know if a koala needs rescuing:
  • being stuck on a fence in a hazardous situation, for example, beside a busy road
  • observed sitting or sleeping on the ground for an extended period
  • sitting in the same tree for more than 48 hours
  • physical signs of injury, for example, limping, inability to climb, blood patches on fur, etc.
  • any visibly missing fur
  • a 'wet' or 'dirty' reddish stained rump
  • conjunctivitis (red, swollen, weepy) eyes.
If you are unsure if a koala requires rescue, please call Wildcare Australia Inc. on 07 5527 2444. Advice can be provided over the phone and a record of the koala's location will be made for further observation or rescue.


  • Koala Breeding Season Has Begun!

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    25 days ago


    July marks the beginning of the koala breeding season which comes to an end in January. Koalas increase their movements across our city during the day and especially during the hours of dusk and dawn. During this time, young koalas are dispersing from their mothers, and adults are in search of a mate.

    This means we all need to be extra vigilant in our koala conservation efforts, as the risk of a koala coming across our path – or our pet’s path – increases. Here's three easy ways you can help to keep koalas safe:

    • Make sure you drive carefully in bushland areas, especially between dusk and dawn when koalas are most active.
    • Pay attention to koala road signs – these are intentionally placed in areas where koalas are known to cross the road.
    • Be a responsible pet owner by making sure your pets are contained within your property; tethered, enclosed, or indoors at night; and kept under control when walking in public.

    Click the image below to hear from Currumbin Wildlife Hospital's Dr Michael Pyne, and Wildcare Australia's Heidi Cuschieri and learn how you can help save koalas during the koala breeding season.


    Video: Hear from Currumbin Wildlife Hospital's Dr Michael Pyne, and Wildcare Australia's Heidi Cuschieri and learn how you can help save koalas during breeding season.


  • Meet Paula the Koala!

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    25 days ago


    Meet Paula! Paula was found sitting on the ground not looking very well by a Helensvale community member on the 21st of March 2014. An immediate call was made to the Wildcare Australia 24 hour hotline (07 55 272 444) to report the sick koala. Shortly after the call, two Wildcare volunteers rescued Paula and took her to the Currumbin Wildlife Hospital.

    Hospital staff and volunteers assessed Paula and determined she was approximately three years old and suffering from chlamydial disease. Paula remained in care for two months where she underwent treatment and rehabilitation for her illness. On the day of her release back into the wild she was given an ear tag with a unique identification number of #1025.

    On the 27th December 2019, some community members walking through Coombabah Lakelands Conservation Area were lucky enough to spot a koala sitting in a tree. They took a photo of the sleepy koala and uploaded it through the City's online Koala Sighting form. Conservation Officers receiving the sighting report were able to identify that the koala was Paula, using the ID number on its ear tag! After informing all those involved in her welfare over the years, everybody has been very excited to see that five years on, Paula is living a happy life in the conservation area - and is looking healthy too!

    This good news story is a great example demonstrating that koala conservation is a collective effort between community members, City staff, Wildcare volunteers and the team at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital!

    On behalf of the City, we would like to sincerely thank all those involved in Paula's care!

  • Koala Conservation Summary 2019!

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    6 months ago

    The City continues to work on protecting the Gold Coast koalas, and while we face challenges we remain optimistic and committed. With community involvement in activities such as reporting koala sightings, becoming a Koala Friend, attending koala community events, planting koala food trees and simply spreading the word, our conservation efforts are strengthened.

    Below you will find a summary of the 2019 koala conservation achievements. These achievements could not have happened if it wasn't for the help of community members, wildlife organisations, research organisations and other City departments.

    HABITAT MANAGEMENT

    Image: The habitat growth from a tree planting day at Schuster Park, Tallebudgera, 2017

    Habitat loss is recognised as the top threatening process to koala populations nationwide. This threat has been exacerbated due to the recent bushfires.

    The Vulnerable Species Management Team continues to collaborate with all parties involved in bushfire management operations.


    2019 conservation achievements to help mitigate the threat of habitat loss:

    • Council resolved to move forward with the purchase of a significant area of land in the Coomera-Pimpama region.
    • 12,620 koala food and habitat trees planted on council land through community plantings and bushcare. Learn more about the City's Beaches to Bushland Landcare Program here.


    KOALA HEALTH

    Image: Joey and Mum undergoing care at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital. A. Sheers, 2017

    Disease such as Chlamydia remains a key factor contributing to population declines across South East Queensland.

    Management of this threat includes the rescue, rehabilitation and release of koalas affected by disease, as well as the ongoing research into vaccines and treatment.

    2019 conservation achievements to help mitigate threats against disease, including Chlamydia:

    • Partnering with Currumbin Wildlife Hospital and Queensland University of Technology to deliver a chlamydia vaccine for wild koalas, including contributing $50,000 per year for 5 years to the project. This project aims to improve options for administering a vaccine to wild koalas.
    • Collaborated with University of Queensland to analyse the genetic differentiation of Gold Coast koalas and identify metapopulations across the city to identify areas of low genetic diversity and better inform options for conservation management.
    • Collaborated with University of Sunshine Coast to complete a study into the effects of antibiotic treatment and chlamydia vaccine on the recovery of diseased koalas to improve future treatment options.
    • Collaborated with University of Queensland and Dreamworld to deliver The Living Koala Genome Bank research project which aims to enhance the genetic diversity of local koala populations by producing disease-free koalas for release into the wild.


    TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

    Image: Koala road treatment and signage.

    Addressing the threats caused by vehicles, roads and rail lines require knowledge of high-frequency vehicle strike and koala crossing areas.

    Help improve this knowledge by reporting any koalas you see and note in your sighting submission that the koala was on, near or crossing a road. Submit here.

    2019 conservation achievements to help mitigate threats against traffic:

    • Collaborated with Griffith University to complete a project analysing the effectiveness of koala speed awareness device (SAD) signs: Gold Coast Smart Signs & Smart Messages: A Driver Change Behaviour project. View report here.
    • Collaborated with the State Government Department of Transport and Main Roads regarding the Tugun M1 upgrade. This resulted in the proposed M1 plans to include koala protection measures such as roadside fencing and a dedicated crossing under the motorway connecting the Burleigh to Springbrook Biodiversity Corridor.


    DOGS AND PESTS

    Image: Koala awareness/dogs prohibited sign.

    Injury to koalas caused by domestic dogs is a major threat to the survival of koalas in urban and semi-urban areas.

    Together we can reduce the number of koalas that are caught by dogs through the creation of koala friendly backyards and by exercising responsible dog ownership behaviours! Learn how you can play your part here.

    2019 conservation achievements to help mitigate threats against dogs and pests:

    • Designed and installed new koala awareness signs in dog parks across the city, including Schuster Park (Tallebudgera), Eddie Kornhauser Recreational Reserve (Elanora) and Discovery Park (Helensvale), promoting responsible dog ownership in koala areas. Read more here.
    • Collaborated with the City’s Pest Management Unit to continue identifying and managing fox dens.


    KOALA POPULATIONS

    Image: City officers conducting koala field surveys.

    Monitoring koala populations involves the collection of data for analysis of population density, habitat use and population health. Ongoing monitoring allows the City to stay informed of changes and trends in koala populations, and is also used to measure the success of the Koala Conservation Plan.

    2019 conservation achievements to help monitor local koala populations:

    • Completion of the City-Wide Koala Habitat Mapping & Monitoring Program Report. View here.
    • Undertook the biennial koala surveys at Burleigh Heads which commenced in 2013.
    • Completed koala surveys at Schuster Park, Tallebudgera.


    COMMUNITY EDUCATION

    Image: Student at St. Andrews Lutheran College reading the Koala Conservation School Education book.


    Community participation is essential to ensure the long-term survival of koalas on the Gold Coast.

    We would like to encourage everyone who hasn't come to an event to come and say hello at our 2020 events!

    2019 conservation achievements to help promote community engagement:

    • 196 new Koala Friends joined the Program.
    • The 360 degree virtual reality koala video series was released to create a fun way to educate community members. Read more here.
    • The City of Gold Coast won the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Core Values Award! Learn more here.
    • Hosted three community Koala Conservation Forums where we discussed koala conservation and ecology with koala experts.
    • Guided three koala educational walks through koala habitat in Coombabah, Coomera and Burleigh Heads.
    • Hosted the Land for Wildlife Koala Habitat & Training Workshop.
    • Held a koala display at the Mudgeeraba Show, Botanical Bazaar, Naturally Gold Coast Festival and the Currumbin Wildlife Hospital Open Day.
    • Attended BioBlitz, a citizen science intensive 24 hour field study in Austinville.
    • Delivered the Koala School Educational Program to six schools within koala priority areas, reaching 950 students!


    KOALA SIGHTINGS

    Image: Male koala in Coombabah, Ray Sweeney, 2018.

    Community reporting of sightings provides an additional source of information when analysing the distribution of koalas throughout the city and can assist in identification of major threats that require action, such as an emerging high-risk vehicle strike locations.

    In 2019 we received 1,211 koala sighting reports!

    The suburbs with the highest number of reported koala sightings in 2019:

    188 Clagiraba

    142 Tallebudgera

    133 Helensvale

    131 Elanora

    122 Burleigh Heads

    46 Coombabah

    Report your koala sightings online here.



  • Koala-dog awareness signage

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    9 months ago

    Did you know that koalas can be found in many of the city’s parks and reserves, some of which are also used by the community to walk and exercise their dogs?

    Recently the Vulnerable Species Management Team were undertaking koala surveys in Park, Tallebudgera, when a koala was seen in the off-leash dog area coming to the ground crossing between trees. Unfortunately the koala was also seen by a dog that was off-leash. The owner of the dog was asked to put her pet on-leash to prevent the koala from being bitten, but did not have a leash with her. The dog quickly approached and bit the koala.

    The koala, named Victa, was rescued by Wildcare Australia Inc. and taken to Currumbin Wildlife Hospital, were treated and he was quickly released back into the wild.

    In response to this incident, koala-dog awareness signs have been developed to alert dog owners that koalas live in our parks and reserves and park users need to ensure they help keep koalas safe and be responsible pet owners.

    Dogs on-leash, dogs prohibited and dogs off-leash signs have been designed to align with the different park zones and will help park users and pet owners understand actions they can take to help keep koalas safe, while still enjoying what the park has to offer. The portable signs can be moved by Council Officers to new locations within the park in response to community requests, reported incidents or to reduce signage habituation.

    The signs are currently installed in key locations at Schuster Park -Tallebudgera; Eddie Kornhauser Recreational Reserve - Elanora; Galapagos Park - Pacific Pines. There are plans to rotate the signs in different parks across the city throughout the year.

    To find out where you can exercise your pet dog head to the link below:

    https://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/thegoldcoast/dog-exercise-areas-972.html

    If you think your dog may have encountered a koala please immediately call Wildcare Australia on 07 55272444.

    Image 1: Victa the koala after getting chased up a tree.

    Image 2: Dog on-leash sign


    Image 3: Koala-dog awareness sign



  • 360 Virtual Reality Koala Video Series

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    9 months ago

    The City of Gold Coast has developed three new virtual reality videos in conjunction with their Koala Friends partners, Wildcare Australia Inc. and Currumbin Wildlife Hospital. They can be viewed on the City’s YouTube page. You can view the videos through any VR headset, or alternatively, use the mouse or touch pad to navigate around the 360 view on any smart phone, tablet or desktop computer.

    Please note that a 360 degree video can only play on internet browsers that support HTML 5 format.

    Koala VR - Koala Field Survey

    Koala VR - CurrumbinWildlife Hospital

    Koala VR - Koala Friendsand Wildcare Australia

    Image 1: Koala getting up close to the 360 degree virtual reality camera

  • Helping our koalas in the heat

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    9 months ago

    Clagiraba residents, Ute and Jens Sohnrey, are passionate about nature conservation and are members of both the Koala Friends, and Land for Wildlife Programs. Their backyard is a favourite for a number of local resident koalas which they are able to recognise individually.

    In an effort to help the local wildlife, particularly during periods of hot dry weather, Ute and Jens have set up a number of wildlife drinking stations on their property. With some help from an infrared camera they have discovered (much to their delight), that they have some thirsty visitors.

    In particular, one regular visitor to their drinking station is a koala named Taggy (because of the red tag in his ear). He first started visiting their property in June 2014 and has been hanging around ever since. In April this year, Taggy was caught and taken to Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital for treatment of conjunctivitis, where it was discovered that he was one of the koalas that was translocated from Coomera as a sub-adult in 2013 (then going by the name Dino). After successful antibiotic treatment he was released back into his home range where he continues to visit Ute and Jens and their irresistible water dish.

    Typically koalas will get most of their water intake from their diet of mainly eucalypt leaves, but will come to the ground to drink water if needed. It is thought that provision of supplementary water could help koalas during heat and drought events, and might help mitigate the effects of climate change.

    Research is currently being undertaken by the University of Sydney on the use of artificial water stations by koalas in Gunnedah, NSW. Initially, the researchers set out to determine if koalas will use these stations to supplement their water needs. During the first 12 months of the study, the research team recorded 605 visits to 10 pairs of water stations, with 401 of these visits being koalas drinking. They found that the total number of visits and total time drinking doubled during summer compared to other seasons. They are now collecting data on the health of the animals and their behaviours. See: https://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2019/06/06/koala-drinking-stations-can-reduce-impact-of-climate-change.htmlhttps://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2019/06/06/koala-drinking-stations-can-reduce-impact-of-climate-change.html

    If you live in an area with koalas and would like to provide water, here are some tips:

    • To avoid accidental drowning, choose a dish that is shallow - a bird bath dish is perfect.

    • Place dish at least 2m up a tree, wedged securely into a fork or onto a custom built platform.

    • If possible, choose a tree that is preferred by koalas. On the Gold Coast, this would be tallowwood (Eucalyptus microcorys), small fruited grey gum (Eucalyptus propinqua), swamp mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta) or river red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis). If you don’t have any of these trees choose another gum tree, or brush box.

    • Change water and clean dish regularly, using a stiff brush to remove slime and algae. Don't use disinfectants or algaecides as this may harm wildlife.

    • If you have a dog, put the water in an area that the dog can't access. At night bring your dog inside, or into an enclosed area inaccessible to koalas.

    If you are unable to find a suitable tree to put the water dish in, you could also put it on the ground, ensuring that:

    • the koala will be safe from predators such as dogs, and

    • the dish is placed at the base of a tree to allow for an easy and quick escape route for koalas.

    Be patient - it may take weeks or months until your water dish starts being used. Even if koalas decide not to use it, it is likely to be popular with other native animals including birds and insects.

    Image 1: Taggy/Dino in October 2015. Credit: Ute and Jen Sohnrey

    Image 2: Taggy/Dino in October 2017 Credit: Ute and Jen Sohnrey

    Image 3: Taggy/Dino in February 2019 Credit: Ute and Jen Sohnrey

    Image 4: Taggy/Dino having a drink in August 2019 Credit: Ute and Jen Sohnrey
  • Meet Maddie, a bushfire survivor!

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    9 months ago

    Maddie was one of many koalas rescued by Wildcare Australia Inc. after the recent and devastating bushfires that swept through the Gold Coast hinterland area. Wildcare Australia In.c volunteers captured and transported Maddie to Currumbin Wildlife Hospital as she was suffering from stress, singed fur and burns to her footpads and nose.

    Maddie was put under a general anaesthetic so the hospital staff could perform further health assessments and the initial clean and dressing of her burns and wounds. Suffering from burns and smoke inhalation, her ongoing intensive care treatment plan consisted of saline foot baths, receiving pain medication, antibiotics, IV fluids and being fed a nutrient rich paste.

    After a month undergoing intensive care by the dedicated staff at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital, Maddie is recovering well. Her fur is growing back, burns and wounds are healing well, her appetite has increased and her lungs are clear.

    She will remain at the hospital while she continues her treatment and the road to recovery.

    On behalf of the Vulnerable Species Management Team and the City, we would like to sincerely thank all the staff and volunteers at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital, Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital and Wildcare Australia Inc. for their tremendous efforts they apply to the rescue and rehabilitation of our native wildlife, including our precious koalas.

    It is currently bushfire season on the Gold Coast so we urge all community members to prepare your home and family for the risk of bushfire. Click here to learn how.

    Image 1: Burns to Maddie's feet. Credit Wildcare Australia Inc.

    Image 2: The aftermath of the bushfire sweeping through koala habitat.


  • Koala Camp – Yangan State School

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    9 months ago

    Jacobs Well Environmental Education Centre recently undertook a science camp with year 5/6 students from Yangan State School (near Warwick, Qld) focusing on growth and survival of living things. Part of the education program was focused on the East Coomera area, looking at the remaining koala habitat and learning about the food and habitat trees that koalas need to survive. Twenty one students/fauna forensic scientists spent part of a day out at Colman Road reserve at Coomera looking for evidence of koalas, using binoculars to spot koalas in the trees, identifying suitable food and habitat trees, and discussing the Coomera koala population and actions being taken to help them to survive.

    The program was a huge success, with three koalas (and one joey) being sighted during the surveys. The students were great at finding koala scats, observing scratch marks on the trees and using eucalyptus keys to identify tree species. The students engaged really well with the opportunity to be real scientists involved in monitoring koala populations and the teachers and parents accompanying thought it was great that they were studying relevant issues and using methodology from the real world. The program was developed in consultation with the City’s Vulnerable Species Management Team and the important information that the students collected has been provided to the City to be used to help inform long term monitoring of koalas in the area and to assist with future planning.

    Figure 1: Koala spotted by Yangan State School Students.
  • Teddy Bear Drive - Naturally Gold Coast Festival

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    9 months ago

    On 24November the City of Gold Coast, together with Councillor Hermann Vorster, are hosting the family-friendly Naturally Gold Coast Festival in the Robina auditorium.

    You can learn all about our local native flora, buy native plants for your garden or speak to a native garden expert for tips. Get up close with our native animals including a range of Australian wildlife such as snakes, lizards, birds and native bees.

    On the day we will be hosting a ‘Teddy Bear’ drive and collecting gold coin donations to raise money for Wildcare Australia who rescue and care for sick, injured, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the intention of returning them to the wild. If you have an old teddy bear that you no longer require, bring it with you on the day and we will pass it on to Wildcare. These teddies will be cuddled by orphaned and sick joeys to help make them feel safe and keep them warm while they are recovering.

    Requirements for teddies:

    • Size range from 10cm to 70cm tall

    • In good, clean, unused condition with no holes, rips or tears

    • Standard polyester filing to enable them to be washed and dried regularly

    • No internal plastic pellets, wheat, batteries etc.

    • Teddies with short fur are preferred

    • No teddies that have been used as dog toys please

    Click here link below to register for the free event.


  • Koala smiley signs slow down drivers

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    12 months ago


    The Gold Coast supports an important population of koalas and is part of South East Queensland’s koala coast. The koala coast population has been steadily declining for a range of reasons, with vehicle-strikes being of particular significance.

    Currently, wildlife warning signs are one of the only wildlife-vehicle collision mitigation measures that can be implemented quickly, for relatively low cost and at the landscape scale. Although static wildlife warning signs are the most common and widespread form of collision mitigation, evidence of their effectiveness is inconsistent. Recent innovations in traffic signage could potentially reduce the risk of wildlife-vehicle strikes and assessing their impact and optimising their designs and messages is important.

    In 2018 the City, in partnership with the Griffith University Road Ecology Group and Redland City Council, undertook a 10-week pilot research project to evaluate how effective different types of dynamic road sign messages were at reducing vehicle speeds in known koala areas.

    The signs used for the trial were Speed Awareness Device (SAD) signs, with standard fluorescent yellow panels and the wording ‘KOALA ZONE’ above a standard yellow warning sign displaying a black koala silhouette. The signs have a built in speed detection radar and display variable images depending on the speed detected. Each sign recorded the date, time, and two speeds: one when the vehicle was first detected and one when the vehicle passed the sign. Control data for each site was collected prior to the signs being installed.

    On the Gold Coast, four signage locations were selected along two roads known for koala vehicle strikes: Discovery Drive in Helensvale and Pine Ridge Road in Coombabah/Runaway Bay. Two message types were displayed:

    • The ‘smiley message’ displayed a green smiling face image at low speeds, a yellow smiling face image with ‘BE ALERT’ at medium speeds and a red sad face image with ‘SLOW!’ at high speeds.
    • The ‘thank you message’ displayed the text ‘THANK YOU’ in green at low speeds, ‘STAY ALERT’ in yellow at medium speeds and ‘SLOW DOWN’ in red at high speeds.

    All signs were programmed to alternate the relevant message with the speed of the vehicle, with the colour of the speed number matching the respective messages.

    Outcomes of trial

    • At all sites, both the smiley message and thank you message reduced average vehicle speed and the proportion of vehicles speeding (which equated to thousands of vehicles).
    • Differences in the driver behaviour between the two sign messages were negligible. However, the smiley message consistently performed slightly better across the sites at reducing driver speed.
    • Compared with the control period, average speed and the percentage of vehicles speeding were reduced following installation of the signs at all sites, except site 4 (Pine Ridge Rd South). It is possible that an unknown and unforeseen event at this site disrupted usual traffic patterns during the control period and resulted in unusually low vehicle speeds being recorded.
    • Vehicle speed tended to reduce more at night, with excessive speeders reducing their speed more than both non-speeders and moderate speeders.

    A special thanks goes to Division 4 Councillor Kristyn Boulton who purchased the two signs that were deployed along Pine Ridge Road, as well as the subsequent WILDLIFE road paintings. The signs on Discovery Drive were funded by the City’s Vulnerable Species Management Team.

    You can download the full report here

    Division 4 Councillor Kristyn Boulton

    Division 4 Councillor Kristyn Boulton with a Koala SAD sign