Conservation Partnerships Program

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Most of the habitat supporting our native plants and animals is found on private properties, not National Parks or reserves.

In recognition of the important role private landholders play in achieving conservation outcomes across the city, the Conservation Partnerships Program offer a number of schemes to support private landholders restoring and protecting their property's wildlife habitat. These schemes include Land for Wildlife, Voluntary Conservation Agreements and the Nature Conservation Assistance Program.


Most of the habitat supporting our native plants and animals is found on private properties, not National Parks or reserves.

In recognition of the important role private landholders play in achieving conservation outcomes across the city, the Conservation Partnerships Program offer a number of schemes to support private landholders restoring and protecting their property's wildlife habitat. These schemes include Land for Wildlife, Voluntary Conservation Agreements and the Nature Conservation Assistance Program.


  • Video: Conservation Partnerships

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    28 Jun 2019
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    The City recognises the important role private landholders play in achieving conservation outcomes across our city. We were delighted to catch up with Andy and Erina to hear their story and capture it in a short video.

    After moving to the Gold Coast hinterland, Andy and Erina got in contact with the Conservation Partnerships Program, and with support, they began their efforts to restore the bushland on their property.

    We hope you find the video inspirational and we encourage you to share it with other landholders who might be in a position to undertake ecological restoration work.

  • Celebrating 20 years event photos

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    14 Dec 2018
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  • Celebrating 20 years of Land for Wildlife on the Gold Coast

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    14 Dec 2018
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    Celebrating 20 years of Land for Wildlife on the Gold Coast


  • Lexie's video message for the 20-year Land for Wildlife anniversary

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    28 Nov 2018
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    Lexie's video message for the 20-year Land for Wildlife anniversary

  • Ecological Restoration technique videos

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    21 Sep 2018
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    Some of our Conservation Partnerships officers have been immortalised in our newly released Ecological Restoration technique videos. These have been designed to assist our Land for Wildlife members and the broader public with best practice techniques in weed control and planting. We hope you find them useful and please share them with other landholders that are conducting ecological restoration.

  • The Wild Macadamia Hunt

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    04 Sep 2018
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    Healthy Land & Water recently launched "The Wild Macadamia Hunt" and are encouraging Land for Wildlife members to participate in the project by telling them about old macadamia trees you have on your property.

    Macadamias are common in cultivation, but these populations are often hybridised and lack genetic diversity. Wild macadamia populations are under threat and it's important we learn more about them.

    So how can you help? Join the hunt! Find a wild macadamia tree and tell Healthy Land & Water about it.

    If it turns out that you've got significant wild macadamia trees on your property we'd like to know about it too! These kinds of records are crucial for us to better understand and help protect the biodiversity of the Gold Coast. Our Gold Coast flora and fauna website provides a valuable resource for residents, students, developers, landholders and conservation groups and those researching the Gold Coast's plants and animals.

    Photo: Glenn Leiper